Narcos 2 featurette: Pablo killed

Narcos fans will want to check this out. It’s a featurette from Netflix about the climax of the latest series of Narcos, the tense drama about Pablo Escobar and the gruesome, gruelling hunt for him. In the second season, notorious drug kingpin Escobar, played by Golden Globe nominee Wagner Moura, is on the run, with the Colombian authorities and the Americans in relentless pursuit – and determined to put an end to his illegal activities. However, the story doesn’t end there. Despite the demise of Escobar, there will be two further series of Narcos. Watch this space…

Narcos 2 on Netflix

The end: law enforcement catches up with Escobar

Breaking Bad — Killer TV No 1

Here is the final entry in our Killer TV top 50. It's been fun revisiting favourite series.

Below is the full list of 50. Are any of your favourites not here? Leave a comment and let us know…

new-breaking-bad-photos-offer-hints-at-the-final-eight-episodes

AMC, 2008-2013

'Nah, come on, man. Some straight like you, giant stick up his ass at like what, 60, he's just gonna break bad?' – Jesse Pinkman

Bryan Cranston, Anna Gunn, Aaron Paul, Dean Norris, Betsy Brandt, RJ Mitte, Bob Odenkirk

Identikit: A humdrum chemistry teacher turns to crime to provide for his family when he is diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer.


WHAT an unlikely premise it must have appeared to US cable network AMC! A low-grade chemistry teacher in dullsville Albuquerque discovers he has cancer and decides to make and sell methamphetamine to provide for his family (his wife's pregnant with their second child). From that idea came one of the most dazzling, profound and blackly funny TV dramas ever. Through five seasons creator Vince Gilligan (once of The X Files) offered a compelling portrait of a man, Walter White, going bad and giving in to his dark side. This journey from decent man to criminal radically subverted TV's traditional formula of flawed characters learning life lessons. Gilligan summed it up: "The goal was to turn him from Mr Chips into Scarface." Walter's transformation is wild but convincing, with the teacher having missed out on making a fortune earlier in life, so that when he faces death he's determined to use his talents to cash in before it's too late. Bursting with superb, three-dimensional characters, sublime acting and bravura visual storytelling, Breaking Bad rarely failed to pack an emotional punch. Sometimes it was bleakly violent, sometimes heartrending. An episode in series three called One Minute was breathlessly suspenseful and moving at the same time, a typical powerhouse piece of drama with Dean Norris (as Hank) putting in an affecting performance as the shaken DEA man, unknowingly facing assassination and confessing to his wife that he may not be the man she thought he was. This coupled with a gallery of nightmarish psychos (Tuco, Gus Fring, the Cartel's hit-men cousins) and memorable characters (such as lawyer Saul 'Better Call Saul!' Goodman) makes Breaking Bad an undeniable modern classic. It's unlikely AMC could out-resource the BBC or ITV, but the (comparatively) fledgling network produced an unforgettable series with a scope and ambition UK channel honchos can't even dream of.

Classic episode: Grilled – crazed Tuco takes Walter and Jesse prisoner in the desert. Tense, with a bloody finale.

Music: Main theme by composer Dave Porter. Fine music throughout the five series, with The Ballard of Heisenberg by Negro y Azul particularly fun.

Watercooler fact: The pink, burnt teddy bear, which is seen throughout series two as a harbinger of the plane crash at the end of the season, appears in black-and-white flash forwards. Only the bear appears in colour, in tribute to the little girl in a red coat in Schindler's List.

Cagney and Lacey — Killer TV No 15

cagneylacey8CBS, 1982-86

‘You feel like a little girl. What I see is a woman of great courage.’ – Mary Beth Lacey

Tyne Daly, Sharon Gless, Al Waxman, John Karlen

Identikit: Two women show their strength and vulnerabilities dealing with their private lives and careers as New York detectives.


The TV landscape is awash with formulaic police procedurals. Cagney and Lacey was one that lifted the genre above the norm, for the first time depicting women as buddies in a tough job. Christine Cagney was the career woman, Mary Beth Lacey was the working mother, and here was a drama that cut away a lot of guff usually seen in hero cop shows. Cagney and Lacey did rough police jobs in brutal New York to make a living, usually close and mutually supportive but occasionally dishing out home truths to each other, often in the privacy of the Ladies. The weekly stories had the usual chases and shootouts, along with the odd corny routine for light relief, but what made it distinctive was the human side of the characters – Mary Beth’s breast cancer, her pregnancy; Chris getting shot, being raped, her failed relationships and dread of ending up alone. It also never shied away from the bleak side of policing, such as Chris’s occasional lapses into booze dependancy (like her cop dad before her). The cases they dealt with exposed the underbelly of grimy Gotham – abandoned children, victims of the pornography industry, sexual abuse – some based on true events. And real issues were confronted – abortion, nuclear weapons (Mary Beth was arrested on an anti-nuke demo), date rape. But in addition to its strength as a crime drama, its depiction of working women in a male environment certainly spoke to women holding down jobs in the real world. It was Christine’s boyfriends and frustrations, and Mary Beth’s family crises that always chimed with fans, rather than unravelling the whodunit. Despite early misgivings by some execs in CBS that the characters would be perceived as ‘dykes’, or at least as too unfeminine, executive producer Barney Rozenzweig steered the show through two cancellations. Sharon Gless was brought in to replace Meg Foster as Cagney after the first series to reduce the character’s aggression a bit. When the show was cancelled at the end of the 82-83 season, it was brought back by popular demand when viewers (many of whom were women) wrote to CBS to complain. It became one of the most cherished series of the 1980s, with Daly and Gless going on to share best actress Emmys for six years on the trot – a unique achievement.

Classic episode: Turn, Turn, Turn, the two-part conclusion to season 6. Christine’s dad dies after a drunken fall, and Mary Beth confronts her about her own disastrous boozing, eventually dragging her to AA. ‘My name is Christine, and I’m an alcoholic.’

Watercooler fact: Barbara Avedon and Barbara Corday actually developed an outline for the series in 1974, but it was turned down by all the networks, none of whom thought a series about women cops would succeed.

http://www.cagneyandlacey.com/Home

Dark Heart, ITV Encore

From ITV Studios Dark Heart on ITV Encore Pictured: The Killer. This photograph is (C) ITV Plc and can only be reproduced for editorial purposes directly in connection with the programme or event mentioned above, or ITV plc. Once made available by ITV plc Picture Desk, this photograph can be reproduced once only up until the transmission [TX] date and no reproduction fee will be charged. Any subsequent usage may incur a fee. This photograph must not be manipulated [excluding basic cropping] in a manner which alters the visual appearance of the person photographed deemed detrimental or inappropriate by ITV plc Picture Desk. This photograph must not be syndicated to any other company, publication or website, or permanently archived, without the express written permission of ITV Plc Picture Desk. Full Terms and conditions are available on the website www.itvpictures.com For further information please contact: james.hilder@itv.com

Brutal – The Killer in Dark Heart

Twisting two-hour tale of revenge murders that seems designed to launch a new cop series

★★★ ITV Encore, week of 5 November (day to be announced)

THE START is grisly, featuring the kind of slow murder that London probably hasn’t seen since the Middle Ages.

It’s the first of a series of horror killings, all featuring suspected paedophiles as the victims. However, if you can get past the grim murder spree, Dark Hart is a diverting tale with good lead characters.

Investigator: Staffe (Tom Riley)

Investigator: Staffe (Tom Riley)

Detective Inspector William Wagstaffe (Tom Riley), is the focus. He is haunted by the murder of his parents during a family holiday in Spain when he was 16 years old. The killers are still at large and ‘Staffe’ is unable to let go until he finds them.

The women in Staffe’s life

By day, Staffe has to keep his cynical officers focused on tracking down a killer who most feel is doing a good job. These include DC Josie Chancellor (Anjli Mohindra), DS Dave Pulford (Kobna Holdbrook-Smith) and DS Rick Johnson (Tom Brooke).

By night he has an on-off relationship with Sylvie (Miranda Raison) and a close but fractious time with his sister, Juliette (Charlotte Riley).

 Juliette [Charlotte Riley]. This photograph is (C) ITV Plc and can only be reproduced for editorial purposes directly in connection with the programme or event mentioned above, or ITV plc. Once made available by ITV plc Picture Desk, this photograph can be reproduced once only up until the transmission [TX] date and no reproduction fee will be charged. Any subsequent usage may incur a fee. This photograph must not be manipulated [excluding basic cropping] in a manner which alters the visual appearance of the person photographed deemed detrimental or inappropriate by ITV plc Picture Desk. This photograph must not be syndicated to any other company, publication or website, or permanently archived, without the express written permission of ITV Plc Picture Desk. Full Terms and conditions are available on the website www.itvpictures.com

Sister – Juliette (Charlotte Riley)

Based on a novel by Adam Creed, the set-up is interesting, but as depicted on screen never really convinces. Staffe’s troubled soul somehow fails to chime with the on-going story, which is heavily concerned with moody interiors and time-lapse sequences.

It’s not in the same league as Happy Valley or even the currently unfolding Paranoid and The Level.

Still, the investigation – once the horror show is put aside – is surprising and holds your interest. The end packs a wallop and Staffe is left in a place where it seems likely he may be brought back for more adventures.

Michael Connelly book launch in Harrogate

The Wrong Side of Goodbye

Michael Connelly’s new book is The Wrong Side of Goodbye

FANS OF thriller writer Michael Connelly and the Amazon Prime series based on his character Bosch may be interested in a special book launch the author is attending in Harrogate next month.

Presented by Harrogate International Festivals, an Evening with Michael Connelly is at 7.30pm on 18 October at the Crown Hotel. Attendees will be able to get his new book, The Wrong Side of Goodbye, on the day of its UK release. Connelly will be holding a book signing afterwards.

Gemma Rowland, Operations Manager at Harrogate International Festivals, which delivers the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival, said: ‘Our crime writing festival is considered the best in the world. Michael Connelly routinely comes up as one of the most popular authors audiences want to see in Harrogate. It’s an honour that he has chosen Harrogate to appear on the date his book launches. The ticket price of £25 is also brilliant value. It includes a copy of the new hardback, which costs £19.99.’

Harry Bosch on Amazon Prime Instant Video

Connelly attended the Crime Writing Festival in 2005. He said: ‘Harrogate is a must. With beautiful locale, smart panels and superb author interaction, it’s one of the best festivals I’ve attended.’

The Florida-based author has sold over 60 million books. The multi-award winning novelist is known for his detective series featuring LA detective Harry Bosch. His novels routinely enter the number-one spot on the New York Times bestseller list. The first Bosch book, City of Bones, was released in 2002.

Connelly is also one of the writers/producers on the TV show, Bosch, streaming on Amazon Prime Instant Video.

A former journalist, he was formerly a police reporter for the Los Angeles Times. He has written several stand-alone thrillers alongside his Bosch series, including the acclaimed legal thriller The Lincoln Lawyer, selected for the Richard and Judy Book Club.

Book online www.harrogateinternationalfestivals.com or Box office: 01423 562 303

The Fall 3, Gillian Anderson, Jamie Dornan

WARNING: Embargoed for publication until 00:00:01 on 20/09/2016 - Programme Name: The Fall - TX: n/a - Episode: Episode 1 (No. 1) - Picture Shows: **STRICTLY EMBARGOED UNTIL 00.01 20th SEPTEMBER 2016** DSI Stella Gibson (GILLIAN ANDERSON) - (C) The Fall 3 Ltd - Photographer: Helen Sloan

Curtain call – DSI Stella Gibson (Gillian Anderson)

It’s all blood and guts as The Fall returns – but will it return to form?

★★★½ BBC2, Thursday, 29 September, 9pm

ANYONE IN TRAINING to join the medical staff of an ER department should watch this opening episode. It must be the most detailed depiction of operating on gunshot victims ever seen in a primetime drama.

The Fall - TX: n/a - Episode: Episode 1 (No. 1) - Picture Shows: **STRICTLY EMBARGOED UNTIL 00.01 20th SEPTEMBER 2016** BEHIND THE SCENES Paul Spector (JAMIE DORNAN) - (C) The Fall 3 Ltd - Photographer: Helen Sloan

Get well soon – Paul Spector (Jamie Dornan)

From CPR to blood units to delving right into Paul Spector’s insides, few aspects of the procedure are spared. Half of the first episode is absorbed in blow-by-blow accounts of medical teams dealing with Spector and his injured victim Rose Stagg. Casualty is kids TV in comparison to this and new face Dr Joe O’Donnell (actor Richard Coyle) is virtually star of the show.

In terms of the drama, you wonder what the point of all this gore is. At the disappointing end of series two, we wondered why Detective Superintendent Stella Gibson had rushed to woman-killer Paul Spector’s side rather than that of the colleague she had recently slept with, the also injured DS Tom Anderson.

And would the much abused victim Rose survive her ordeal at his hands? Has Anderson made it?

Gillian Anderson is as icy as ever as Stella

These cliffhangers are forgotten for a while. In what is a rather strange return, The Fall instead focuses on Spector’s travails in the operating theatre. The medical emphasis seems to be pointing out the irony of the all the effort that would go into saving a vile murderer. As one of the medical teams at Belfast General Hospital says, ‘No expense spared.’

The Fall - TX: n/a - Episode: Episode 1 (No. 1) - Picture Shows: **STRICTLY EMBARGOED UNTIL 00.01 20th SEPTEMBER 2016** BEHIND THE SCENES Paul Spector (JAMIE DORNAN) - (C) The Fall 3 Ltd -The Fall Photographer: Helen Sloan

Rebel with a cause – Katie Benedetto (Aisling Franciosi)

Eventually, we get some relief from sutures and spleens. Gibson is confronted about her apparent devotion to Spector and we find out about Rose and Tom’s long-term prospects. The pressure is also turned up on Stella as the police honchos suspect she is out of control.

Katie (Aisling Franciosi) is still the troublesome teen, ostracising family and friends in her desperation to rush to her imaginary lover’s bedside.

Happily Gillian Anderson is still on great form as the Ice Queen, inscrutable, talking in whispers. She has a lot more to do than Jamie Dornan as Spector, who gets to move a finger. And John Lynch looks as constipated as ever as Stella’s boss and ex-lover Jim Burns.

Will The Fall become The Fail?

I think The Fall lost so much viewer goodwill at the end of series two that many think it will never be anything other than The Fail. Writer Allan Cubitt had got inside the sick mind of a psychopath and set up the hunted-hunted theme brilliantly in series one. He also picked up several awards along the way, including a British Screenwriters’ Award.

Then there was that ending to conclude series two, which seemed to make nonsense of Stella as a character. I’ve heard of people close to the show also predicting that it’s going to be rubbish. However, that might be premature. I suspect Cubitt was setting up a cliffhanger with that finale and will backtrack by getting Stella in the groove once again.

And it wouldn’t be The Fall if if didn’t also chill us. Devotees will soon realise as episode one closes that the nurse attending Spector (new cast member Aisling Bea) is just his dark-haired type…

 Programme Name: The Fall - TX: n/a - Episode: Episode 1 (No. 1) - Picture Shows: *Embargoed until 00.01 20th September 2016* DREAM SEQUENCE Paul Spector (JAMIE DORNAN) - (C) The Fall 3 Ltd - Photographer: Helen Sloan

Dream sequence – Paul Spector (Jamie Dornan)

Paranoid, ITV, Robert Glenister, Indira Varma, Lesley Sharp

RED PRODUCTIONS FOR ITV PARANOID EPISODE 1 Pictured: INDIRA VARMA as Nina Suresh and NEIL STUKE as Michael Niles. This photograph is (C) ITV Plc and can only be reproduced for editorial purposes directly in connection with the programme or event mentioned above. Once made available by ITV plc Picture Desk, this photograph can be reproduced once only up until the transmission [TX] date and no reproduction fee will be charged. Any subsequent usage may incur a fee. This photograph must not be manipulated [excluding basic cropping] in a manner which alters the visual appearance of the person photographed deemed detrimental or inappropriate by ITV plc Picture Desk. This photograph must not be syndicated to any other company, publication or website, or permanently archived, without the express written permission of ITV Plc Picture Desk. Full Terms and conditions are available on the website www.itvpictures.com For further information please contact: Patrick.smith@itv.com

Dark motives: but do the police have anything to be paranoid about?

A shocking murder kicks off a tense conspiracy thriller

★★★★ ITV, Thursday, 29 September, 9pm

TV IS SO OBSESSED with crime drama that it’s hard for any new series to stand out from the mass of cops-and-killer yarns. Paranoid does stand out. It initially has the hallmarks of a traditional whodunit – but then pulls off the trick of veering into darker territory.

It starts with the shocking murder of a mother in a playground. You know the formula – star detectives in plastic suits turn up and make cynical comments to the forensics team.

And when CCTV fingers Jacob Appleby, a suspect suffering from psychopathic schizophrenia, it all looks straightforward. However, events turn more ominous.

RED PRODUCTIONS FOR ITV PARANOID EPISODE 1 Pictured: INDIRA VARMA as Nina Suresh and DINO FETSCHER as Alec Wayfield. This photograph is (C) ITV Plc and can only be reproduced for editorial purposes directly in connection with the programme or event mentioned above. Once made available by ITV plc Picture Desk, this photograph can be reproduced once only up until the transmission [TX] date and no reproduction fee will be charged. Any subsequent usage may incur a fee. This photograph must not be manipulated [excluding basic cropping] in a manner which alters the visual appearance of the person photographed deemed detrimental or inappropriate by ITV plc Picture Desk. This photograph must not be syndicated to any other company, publication or website, or permanently archived, without the express written permission of ITV Plc Picture Desk. Full Terms and conditions are available on the website www.itvpictures.com For further information please contact: Patrick.smith@itv.com

Too close for comfort?Indira Varma as Nina Suresh and Dino Fetscher as Alec Wayfield

Robert Glenister as Bobby Day

One of the detectives, Bobby Day (an affecting turn from Robert Glenister), thinks someone is watching the police. And when messages turn up at the police station for Day, it is clear there is more to the murder of mum Angela Benton, a GP, than meets the eye.

One of the messages – ‘You have no idea what you’re up against’ – is a clear warning.

What makes this mystery engrossing is the interesting characters writer Bill Gallagher has created. His credits include Lark Rise to Candleford and The Paradise, so Paranoid seems an interesting shift of gear for him.

The police characters certainly have their own demons. Bobby Day is suffering from panic attacks, which he tries to hide from his colleagues. [Read more…]

The Level, ITV, Karla Crome

KARLA crome (Nancy Devlin) and LAURA HADDOCK (Hayley) For further information contact Patrick Smith patrick.smith@itv.com 0207 157 3044 ©ITV This photograph is the ©ITV and can only be reproduced for editorial purposes directly in connection with the programme or event mentioned above, or ITV plc. Once made available by ITV plc Picture Desk, this photograph can be reproduced once only up until the transmission [TX] date and no reproduction fee will be charged. Any subsequent usage may incur a fee. This photograph must not be manipulated [excluding basic cropping] in a manner which alters the visual appearance of the person photographed deemed detrimental or inappropriate by ITV plc Picture Desk. This photograph must not be syndicated to any other company, publication or website, or permanently archived, without the express written permission of ITV Plc Picture Desk. Full Terms and conditions are available on the website www.itvpictures.com For further information please contact: PATRICK SMITH

Peer pressure: Karla Crome (Nancy Devlin) and Laura Haddock (Hayley)

A rising female detective with an emotional attachment to a gangster is pitched into a world of danger

★★★ ITV, Friday, 30 September, 9pm

THE SCRIPT for this new ITV thriller was several years in gestation. It was time well spent because writers Gaby Chiappe and Alexander Perrin have come up with a taut gripper that has emotional punch.

HILLBILLY TV FOR ITV THE LEVEL on Picture shows: KARLA CROME (Nancy Devlin), ROBERT JAMES-COLLIER (Kevin O'Dowd), LINDSEY COULSON (Michelle Newman) and NOEL CLARK (Gunner Martin) For further information contact Patrick Smith patrick.smith@itv.com 0207 157 3044 ©ITV This photograph is the ©ITV and can only be reproduced for editorial purposes directly in connection with the programme or event mentioned above, or ITV plc. Once made available by ITV plc Picture Desk, this photograph can be reproduced once only up until the transmission [TX] date and no reproduction fee will be charged. Any subsequent usage may incur a fee. This photograph must not be manipulated [excluding basic cropping] in a manner which alters the visual appearance of the person photographed deemed detrimental or inappropriate by ITV plc Picture Desk. This photograph must not be syndicated to any other company, publication or website, or permanently archived, without the express written permission of ITV Plc Picture Desk. Full Terms and conditions are available on the website www.itvpictures.com For further information please contact: PATRICK SMITH

Karla Crome, Robert James-Collier, Lindsey Coulson and Noel Clarke

Karla Crome plays Nancy Devlin, a detective with a difference. She is inextricably linked to gangster Frank Le Saux – an affecting turn from Philip Glenister. Le Saux was a father figure to Nancy during her turbulent childhood. Meanwhile, his daughter, Hayley (Laura Haddock), became her best friend.

This compromising relationship has survived her rise to distinction as a detective sergeant. When we first meet Nancy she is being paraded before colleagues after saving her boss, Kevin O’Dowd (Downton‘s Robert James-Collier), from a lethal attack.

Nancy’s tracked by a killer

However, Nancy is also in the habit of giving Frank a wink if he ever comes under investigation.

When Frank then contacts her because he is in trouble, Nancy’s career is suddenly under threat, to say nothing of her life. As she struggles to avoid being implicated in a murder investigation, she is also being tracked by a killer.

HILLBILLY TV FOR ITV THE LEVEL on Picture shows: LAURA HADDOCK as Hayley For further information contact Patrick Smith patrick.smith@itv.com 0207 157 3044 ©ITV This photograph is the ©ITV and can only be reproduced for editorial purposes directly in connection with the programme or event mentioned above, or ITV plc. Once made available by ITV plc Picture Desk, this photograph can be reproduced once only up until the transmission [TX] date and no reproduction fee will be charged. Any subsequent usage may incur a fee. This photograph must not be manipulated [excluding basic cropping] in a manner which alters the visual appearance of the person photographed deemed detrimental or inappropriate by ITV plc Picture Desk. This photograph must not be syndicated to any other company, publication or website, or permanently archived, without the express written permission of ITV Plc Picture Desk. Full Terms and conditions are available on the website www.itvpictures.com For further information please contact: PATRICK SMITH

Laura Haddock as Hayley

The Level, which refers to an area of Brighton – where the six-part series is set – and the idea of being on the level, is a very effective thriller. It is fast and tense without implausibly stretching the story.

We’ve seen Karla Crome in series such as the excellent Prisoners’ Wives and Misfit. She has no trouble holding the limelight here. Laura Haddock, usually seen in big-budget nonsense like Da Vinci’s Demons, is spot on as the ballsy badgirl who was once close to Nancy. [Read more…]

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