Broadchurch 3 starts filming

Broadchurch 3 starts filming

David Tennant and Olivia Colman (photographed on their first day on set of the third series) reprise their roles as DI Alec Hardy and DS Ellie Miller, with Jodie Whittaker and Andrew Buchan returning to play Beth and Mark Latimer

ITV’s third series of Broadchurch started filming yesterday, with Sir Lenny Henry and Roy Hudd joining David Tennant and Olivia Colman on the cast. Other new faces will include Julie Hesmondhalgh, Sarah Parish, Charlie Higson and Georgina Campbell.

The new series will herald a brand new case for Miller and Hardy, with the detectives reuniting to investigate a serious sexual assault.

‘This is the final chapter of Broadchurch,’ said Chris Chibnall. ‘We have one last story to tell, featuring both familiar faces and new characters. I hope it’s a compelling and emotional farewell to a world and show that means so much to me.’

After the huge success of series 1, the second season was, let’s face it, a crashing and messy disappointment. With this cast, it would be great if Broadchurch could finish on a high.

Broadchurch (series 1) — Killer TV No21

EMBARGOED_UNTIL_18TH_DECEMBER_BROADCHURCH_SERIES2_EP1_06

Cliffhanger: Broadchurch 1

2013-2014, ITV

‘You’re going to stop asking questions about me.’ Susan Wright

‘Why would I do that?’ Maggie Radcliffe

‘I know men who would rape you…’ – Susan Wright

David Tennant, Olivia Colman, Andrew Buchan, Jodie Whittaker, Pauline Quirke, Arthur Darvill, Vicky McClure, David Bradley, Will Mellor, Carolyn Pickles, Matthew Gravelle

Identikit: The investigation of the murder of a boy in a small seaside town in Dorset and the effect it has throughout the community.


BROADCHURCH_EP6_02

Olivia Colman and David Tennant

logosLet’s be clear: series 1 was terrific, while series 2 completely lost the plot. So Broadchurch gets in the Killer 50 on the strength of series 1, and the second outing will be discreetly ignored here (though this was CrimeTimePreview’s verdict at the time). Perhaps the key to Broadchurch 1’s huge success was that it was a project writer Chris Chibnall believed in so much that he wrote it for his own satisfaction, a labour of love, without being commissioned, without executive tinkering, before taking it to ITV. He was inspired by living near Dorset’s Jurassic Coast (it was filmed mainly at West Bay), and wanted to explore the impact of a boy’s murder on a seaside community. The body of Danny Latimer is found on the beach and during the next eight episodes we witness the crime’s emotional reverberations on the family, police, press, businesses and the local church. Where the victim’s place in the world is barely touched on in many cop shows, here Broadchurch perhaps picks up on the huge success of the first series of The Killing (Forbrydelsen) and became a drama with greater depth and characterisation than most series have. It is also, of course, a whodunit that got everyone talking (even journalists were self-righteously outraged when previews of the final episode were not made available to them), so it has the usual red-herrings and coincidences to knock down before the end. But Broadchurch had far more going for it than a mechanical Agatha Christie plot. The family’s agony was portrayed seriously through affecting performances, particularly from Jodie Whittaker and Andrew Buchan as Danny’s parents – an early scene in which Mark identifies his son’s body is heartrending. And what a terrific ensemble cast, with Vicky McClure, Pauline Quirke, Arthur Darvill and Will Mellor among those giving the story great depth and colour. Then there is the dream team of leads in David Tennant and Olivia Colman as the tormented senior detective and local officer who had been expecting to get his job. Broadchurch could be a bit of a game-changer for British crime shows, veering away from the high body counts, forensic fantasies and cardboard characters of Midsomer Murders, Lewis, Silent Witness and the like. A third series will start filming this summer. After the implausibilies of season 2, it will have its work cut to recapture the specialness of the original.

Classic episode: The final episode was full of drama. The murderer is revealed halfway through and writer Chris Chibnall then brilliantly takes time to show how devastating the revelation is for Ellie, the Latimers and Hardy.

Spin-off: The US version, made by Fox, is called Gracepoint and went into production quite soon after the ITV version proved so successful. David Tennant reprised his role – with a change of name from Alec Hardy to Emmett Carver and an American accent – while Breaking Bad’s Anna Gunn took Olivia Colman’s part as his police colleague.

Watercooler fact: The cast were not told who the murderer was so that the performance of the actor playing him/her would not be swayed by the knowledge.

Broadchurch 2, first episode verdict

Oliva Colman as Ellie Miller in Broadchurch 2 ITV
It’s a lonely road for Ellie Miller in Broadchurch 2. Pics: ITV

[dropcap]W[/dropcap]riter/creator Chris Chibnall has hit a bullseye in re-energising a popular drama that seemed to have reached a pretty conclusive end in series one.

David Tennant said ‘by the first commercial break people will be enthralled‘, and he was spot on. Because by then we had the first major twist – Joe spoiling everyone’s day by pleading not guilty to the murder of Danny.

Sandbrook’s as bad as Broadchurch

Getting detectives Ellie Miller (Olivia Colman) and Alec Hardy (Tennant) back into the action was smoothly done, too. We’d assumed Ellie would have had to move to Timbuktu after husband Joe was exposed as the hateful small-town child killer, but traffic duty in Devon was bad enough.

JOE SIMS,CHARLOTTE RAMPLING and ANDREW BUCHAN in Broadchurch 2
Nige helps a distressed Mark, while Jocelyn looks on

We also found out more about Hardy’s big case that turned sour before Broadchurch – in Sandbrook. Hardy’s health was rocky in series one and he is no longer a detective, but he is still trying to protect Claire (Eve Myles), who testified against her dangerous-looking husband, Lee Ashworth, whom Hardy had pegged as a murderer. Ashworth walked free when the Sandbrook trial collapsed, and is now stalking Claire and Broadchurch.

Charlotte Rampling v Marianne Jean-Baptiste

Another terrific new plotline involved Charlotte Rampling as retired lawyer Jocelyn, fronting up to Oscar-nominated Marianne Jean-Baptiste as QC Sharon, Jocelyn’s former protégé and now defender

MARIANNE JEAN-BAPTISTE as Sharon, Broadchurch 2
Sharon has Danny’s body disinterred

of Joe Miller. Their polite but highly charged face-off on the Broadchurch sands at the conclusion of this opener has set up a blockbuster confrontation between the women in court.

My one doubt about the story now is that if Joe ends up being proved not to have killed Danny, Chibnall will have led us all up the garden path and it could end up making a nonsense of the drama that gripped us all in series one. Not quite on a level with Bobby Ewing dying in what turned out to be a dream in Dallas, but still potentially annoying.

Favourite scene from ep1? Mine was Miller resisting Hardy’s offer to ‘hug it off’ in the Ladies. Olivia Colman even blew David Tennant away in a heartbreaking scene that was still tender and funny. Superb.

Broadchurch on ITV Player
10 Lessons from Broadchurch 2, Mail Online

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Broadchurch 2, ITV, David Tennant, Olivia Colman, Jodie Whittaker PREVIEW

Spot the new faces in the line-up for Broadchurch 2. Pics: ITV

Rating: ???

ITV: starts Monday, 5 January, 9pm

Story: Probably another crime in the seaside town of Broadchurch, investigated by Alex Hardy and Ellie Miller…

OMG, this is so exciting. Broadchurch 2 is so amazing they won’t let anyone see it!

What happens next is so thrilling they don’t trust the media to view it without incontinently blabbing

JODIE WHITTAKER as Beth Latimer, CHARLOTTE BEAUMONT as Chloe Latimer and ANDREW BUCHAN as Mark Latimer Broadchurch 2
How will the Latimers fit into Broadchurch 2?

all the show’s secrets on social media within seconds of the end credits.

For the first time in my experience of working in TV publications going back a decade or two, there will be no previews of the opening episode or any that follow.

Is this a slight overreaction? When the first series launched in 2013 ITV courted publicity and reviews, and the series was a huge success, reaching audiences of nine million and winning four Baftas, two Royal Television Society awards and an international Peabody gong. Was the series spoiled by the huge level of coverage the media devoted it?

Broadchurch secrecy

All of Broadchurch‘s success was deserved. But now that Doctor Who levels of secrecy have descended on series two, it suggests the makers are perhaps putting too much stress on the drama’s twists and surprises. Broadchurch wouldn’t have won its audience if it had simply been viewed to find out whodunit.

New character beside the seaside – Sharon (Marianne Jean-Baptiste)

It was also about the quality of the acting and production and the emotional impact of the storytelling.

Writer/creator Chris Chibnall says: ‘We’re doing this because we loved how audiences connected with, and responded to, Broadchurch the first time round. We know we’ll never replicate the way the first series took hold but nonetheless we’re doing our best to ensure our story goes unrevealed, and the audience can remain unspoilered, until it’s broadcast on ITV. We’d like everyone to see the pieces fall into place (and they will) when you watch episode one on that Monday night. And for people to find out – as much as possible – together, at the same time.

‘That’s not such a crazy idea, is it?’

New faces: Charlotte Rampling and Marianne Jean-Baptiste

We can at least reveal that the familiar faces – David Tennant, Olivia Colman, Andrew Buchan, Jodie Whittaker – are joined by new characters played by Charlotte Rampling, Eve Myles, James D’Arcy and Marianne Jean-Baptiste, with the latter commenting on the show’s secrecy: ‘All I’d say is you

ARTHUR DARVILL as Rev Paul Coates in Broadchurch 2
Will the Rev Coates feature more prominently this time?

think you know what you know but you don’t know anything…’

There’s no denying it will be interesting to see how Chris Chibnall breathes life into a story that reached such a shattering climax. The show was filmed during last summer in West Bay, Dorset, with Tennant and Colman recreating their characters, detectives Alex Hardy and Ellie Miller.

But after the last series, which focused on the murder of 11-year-old Danny Latimer, Hardy’s health and career were shattered and Miller discovered her husband Joe was the murderer.

David Tennant: ‘Clever and exciting bit of writing’

Let’s leave the last scintilla of a clue to the new series to David Tennant: ‘It’s a very different type of story. I think we all found it hard to predict where Chris (Chibnall) was going to go and how he was

DAVID TENNANT as D.I Alec Hardy and OLIVIA COLMAN as D.S Ellie Miller Broadchurch 2
In deep again: Miller and Hardy

going to tell a story faithful to season one without underselling the veracity of it. It would have been ludicrous and a bit disappointing to discover another body on the beach and begin another eight episodes of whodunnit… he absolutely doesn’t do that. Tonally it’s the same show but structurally it is completely different.

‘This is a really clever and exciting bit of writing, still a thriller but not the same type. Without giving anything away, it is almost impossible to describe, but by the first commercial break people will be enthralled.’

Cast: David Tennant Alec Hardy, Olivia Colman Ellie Miller, Jodie Whittaker Beth Latimer, Andrew Buchan Mark Latimer, Charlotte Rampling Jocelyn, Marianne Jean-Baptiste Sharon,

Arthur Darvill Rev Paul Coates, Eve Myles Claire,  James D’Arcy Lee, Carolyn Pickles Maggie Radcliffe, Jonathan Bailey Olly Stevens, Tanya Franks Lucy Stevens

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The Great Train Robbery, BBC1, Luke Evans, Jim Broadbent, Neil Maskell, James Fox PREVIEW

Robbing the mail train. The Great Train Robbery BBC1
Rogue mail – the Great Train Robbery in action. Pics: BBC

Rating: ★★★★

BBC1: Wednesday, 18 December, 8pm

Story: Part one is called ‘A Robber’s Tale’, and follows Bruce Reynolds and his gang as they plan and carry out the £2.6million robbery of a mail train. The second film, ‘A Copper’s Tale’, will be told from the viewpoint of DCS Tommy Butler and his elite squad of investigators.

ALONG WITH the assassination of President Kennedy and the pilot episode of Doctor Who, 1963 was famous for the Great Train Robbery, a startlingly audacious bit of blagging that shook Britain when the news of it came out in August that year.

For channel honchos at the Beeb, the attraction of dramatising it is obvious – it’s based on a true event (ITV are playing the same game with soon-to-be seen Lucan), and it’s got period clobber and old cars, a must every other drama these days.

Bruce Reynolds (LUKE EVANS) Great Train Robbery BBC1
Ambitious Bruce Reynolds (Luke Evans)

For the writer Chris Chibnall, who also wrote this year’s major crime drama Broadchurch, he was fascinated by the crime as ‘piece of modern folklore’ and the attraction of exploring the ‘huge untold story’ of the Flying Squad officers who tracked the robbers – which he does in episode two.

ITV took an interesting take on the crime with Mrs Biggs last year, and Phil Collins played Buster Edwards in the 1988 film Buster, but considering how much newspaper ink the police, the escapes and escapades of this bunch of crooks generated, Chibnall and the BBC would seem to have plenty of untold story to explore.

Luke Evans is charismatic as Bruce Reynolds

And they tell it really well. It is tinged with nostalgia but also captures the element of class aggro

The gang celebrates its haul. The Great Train Robbery BBC1
We’re in the money!

involved, with gang leader Bruce Reynolds – the focus of the first of two 90-minute films – out to get rich while taking on the establishment.

The establishment definitely noticed, as Reynolds and his crew shocked themselves and the whole country with a then monstrous haul of £2.6million from the overnight mail train from Glasgow (equivalent to £41million today). The first film is full of a young generation of actors as the robbers, such as Neil Maskell, Jack Roth and Martin Compston, with Luke Evans outstanding as Reynolds.

Reynolds’ appetite for a big robbery is fuelled following the poor takings from a well-planned and stylishly filmed airport robbery. After getting a tip from a mysterious Ulsterman that the mail train is a sitting duck, with no police or guards protecting it, Reynolds is hooked on devising a heist.

‘It’s Her Majesty’s mail, mate,’ says Buster Edwards (Maskell). ‘Nobody would have the nerve – that’s how they see it.’

E-Types, Jags and beehives

Reynolds pulls together a 15-strong team with near military precision to halt the train and offload it.

DCS Butler (JIM BROADBENT) Great Train Robbery BBC1
In part 2 we meet DCS Butler (Jim Broadbent)

Good heist stories always have plenty of adrenaline and tension, and this one doesn’t fall short. But it also has some laugh-out moments.

Such as the scene in which Gordon Goody and Reynolds, trying to teach themselves how to drive a train – they will have to move the mail train once they’ve captured it – steal a train from a depot and then can’t find the brake. They finally leap from the speeding train into the snow, leaving the runaway engine to plough on into the night.

The period is sharply invoked here, with E-Types Jags and beehives and music from Nina Simone and Sinatra. It looks good and is a fascinating story, right up to the moment the gang in their farmhouse count the huge piles of used banknotes.

Jim Broadbent and Robert Glenister

The irony is that all it bought them was a life on the run (see what happened next to the robbers here: What Happened to the Great Train Robbers). As Reynolds says, ‘It’s too much.’

Great Train Robbery BBC1 The robbers. Gordon Goody (PAUL ANDERSON), Brian Field (DEL SYNOTT), Roy James (MARTIN COMPSTON), Buster Edwards (NEIL MASKELL), John Daly (JAMES BYE), Bruce Reynolds (LUKE EVANS), Charlie Wilson (JACK ROTH), Alf (BILL THOMAS), Roger Cordrey (NICHOLAS MURCHIE), Ronnie Biggs (JACK GORDON), Tommy Wisby (JORDAN LONG)
The gang’s all here – Bruce and his lads

An older generation of actors – with Jim Broadbent as DCS Tommy Butler, leading the likes of Robert Glenister, Tim Piggott Smith and James Fox – will steal the spotlight in the second part of the story, A Copper’s Tale, which should be particularly compelling, if Chris Chibnall is on the money, as it were.

As one of the robbers says, ‘We kicked the establishment up the arse.’ And the pressure to nab them after that was immense.

Cast: Luke Evans Bruce Reynolds, Neil Maskell Buster Edwards, Martin Compston Roy James, Paul Anderson Gordon Goody, Jack Roth Charlie Wilson; Jim Broadbent DCS Tommy Butler, Robert Glenister DI Frank Williams, Nick Moran DS Jack Slipper, Tim Piggott Smith DS Maurice Ray, James Wilby John Wheater, James Fox Henry Brooke

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David Tennant joins US version of Broadchurch

David Tennant Pic: Alacoolk

Guest contributor KEVIN GANNON investigates news that David Tennant is translating his character of detective inspector Hardy to the new American version of ITV’s Broadchurch

QUITE OFTEN, popular British shows and films make their way to the United States with a completely new cast, set of writers, and everything in between. But there have been a few standout exceptions, including Mark Strong’s reprisal of his own leading role (Frank Agnew) in the stateside adaptation of Channel 4’s Low Winter Sun for Fox TV.

Now Broadchurch, one of our favourite shows of 2013 – we didn’t call it the best new UK crime series for nothing – can be added to that small list, according to US television bible TV Guide. And David Tennant is set to reprise his leading role in the American version.

Tennant with an American accent

For those who missed it, Broadchurch featured David Tennant’s character, detective inspector Alec Hardy, arriving at a sleepy coastal town to investigate the murder of a young boy. The child’s death is the driving force of the show’s narrative as Hardy interviews members of the community to find answers. What he does discover is that almost everyone is a suspect.

Therein lies the reason the show is so intriguing, in addition to the sharp writing. Speaking of writing, the show’s creator, Chris Chibnall, is penning the US series premiere for Fox, and he’s executive producing the show, too.

Tennant’s role in the remake will be similar, though it’s not clear if the plot will remain exactly the same. Also, he’ll be masking his native Scottish accent and speaking with a more Americanised accent. The drama will be filmed in January.

Will David Tennant return for ITV’s Broadchurch 2?

Oliva Colman and David Tennant in ITV's Broadchurch 2013
Oliva Colman and David Tennant in Broadchurch. Pic: ITV

This will be the second time Tennant, who was of course the tenth Doctor Who, has crossed the pond to crack America. In 2010 he made a pilot for a show called Rex Is Not Your Lawyer, but the series was never commissioned.

The UK version of Broadchurch has been renewed by ITV for a second season, although it hasn’t been confirmed just yet whether or not Tennant will be on board for that. Will making the American Broadchurch prevent him from returning for ITV’s second series?

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Broadchurch on DVD

DVD: ★★★★½
Extras: ★★★★

IT’S BEEN the most talked about crime series of the year and a real triumph for ITV. Audiences and critics were gripped by the whodunit and  seven million people were tuning in, which in these multi-channel days is a blockbuster figure.

But despite all the hoo-haa about whether young Danny’s killer was his dad or his friend or the vicar or creepy Susan, the eight-part drama had a lot more to it than the jaded mechanics of a traditional whodunit.

Broadchurch broke the mould of police procedurals by discarding the corpse before each ad break that is the norm in shows such as Midsomer and Lewis along with the clever detectives deducing who the perpetrator was. It was about the gut-wrenching tragedy of the Latimer family, the behaviour of the press, the strife at the police station and the role of the church.

It was beautifully written by Chris Chibnall and had a first class cast, headed by David Tennant and Olivia Colman, brilliantly supported by Jodie Whittaker, Andrew Buchan, Vicky McClure, Arthur Darvill, Pauline Quirke and Will Mellor.

Chibnall reveals in the excellent special features on this new DVD release that he wrote the drama on spec because it was something he really wanted to write. And that desire to produce a really good, heartfelt  story before taking it to ITV is perhaps the secret to its success.

Broadchurch on DVD, released 20 May, running time 400 minutes on three discs. RRP: £25.99. Cert TBC

PRIZE DRAW

We have one copy of the complete series of Broadchurch worth £25.99 to give away. All you have to do is join the CrimeTimePreview gang (see the column on the right) to enter a prize draw for this fantastic series. The first name drawn on the closing date of Friday, 24 May, will be sent a copy of the DVD.
This offer is open to UK residents only. Prize Draw entrants must register as members of CrimeTimePreview (see column, right); one name will be drawn on the closing date (Friday, 24 May) and will be posted a free copy of Broadchurch. The selectee will need to provide their postal address. No prize alternatives. If anyone registers but declines the Broadchurch DVD, an alternative winner will be selected. Good luck!

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Broadchurch — great finish for the best new UK crime series

ITV's Broadchurch, starring Oskar McNamara as Danny
Oskar McNamara as Danny. Pics: ITV

Broadchurch revealed its secrets in the final episode last night and confirmed its position as the best new UK crime series since Sherlock. The Beeb, BSkyB, Channel 4 and ITV churn out dozens of murder dramas each year but none has generated the buzz that Broadchurch did.

Much of the watercooler chat was about whodunit, but Broadchurch was a much better show than those that are simply puzzles over a perpetrator’s identity, intriguing though that was. The bookies, and most of us in the audience, strongly suspected it was Joe, anyway.

Broadchurch worked so brilliantly because it learnt from the first series of The Killing and was a seering exploration of a crime and its painful fallout for a community – ambitions way above most TV crime fare. Central to the whole story was the Latimers and the heartbreak and confused loss they were suffering. Hats off to writer and creator Chris Chibnall (United, Law & Order: UK) for devising such a rich, compelling drama.

Olivia Colman, David Tennant in Broadchurch, ITV
Olivia Colman and David Tennant

Olivia Colman was superb throughout, but really went above the call of duty in portraying the nightmare that befell Ellie during the finale. David Tennant was very good – as usual – as Alec, the lead detective who was by turns irritating and vulnerable. And, for my money, Andrew Buchan also stood out at times as Danny’s dad, particularly early in the series in the scene when he had to identify his son’s body.

  • Daily Telegraph final episode review
  • Guardian final episode review
  • Independent final episode review

ITV wasted no time last night in announcing that Broadchurch will be back. Which will be interesting, seeing that Alec is being invalided out of the force and Ellie will have to leave town. The story is, of course, being kept under wraps, but will go into production next year. More than nine-million viewers have been watching, so another series is not a surprise.

My guess is series two could involve Sandbrook, Alec’s previous and disastrous case.

Anyway, final word to Chris Chibnall  – ‘The whole Broadchurch team has been delighted and properly gobsmacked by the response from ITV viewers. When I first talked to Peter Fincham and Laura Mackie, ITV’s Director of Drama about Broadchurch, I mentioned that if people liked it, there was another very different story we could tell afterwards. I’m really thrilled we’re going to tell that story too.’

Here’s the extra scene from Broadchurch that was posted on Facebook last night…

• In other news, ITV also announced yesterday that there will be a fourth series of Vera. Brenda Blethyn will this summer start filming four new 120-minute stories based on the character created by crime author Ann Cleeves.

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