Boardwalk Empire — Killer TV No 11

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HBO/Sky Atlantic, 2010-present

‘Nucky, all I want is an opportunity.’ – Jimmy

‘This is America, ain’t it? Who the fuck’s stopping you?’ – Nucky

Steve Buscemi, Kelly Macdonald, Michael Shannon, Michael Stuhlbarg, Stephen Graham

Identikit: The rise and regime of Enoch ‘Nucky’ Thompson, the corrupt Treasurer of Atlantic County, who exploits the corrupt possibilities of the Prohibition period of the 1920s.


logosRichly textured and ambitious epic about that unhinged, thrilling period of Prohibition America in the 1920s. It’s the kind of show only HBO and the American cable networks could make, tackling a cast of real characters and big subjects that dwarf any and every series made in the UK. Steve Buscemi is the focus as Nucky Thompson, based on Atlantic City’s real corrupt political figure of Enoch L Johnson, who sanctioned and cashed in on the bootlegging rackets in cahoots with the most lurid gangland figures in US history – Al Capone, Lucky Luciano, Arnold Rothstein. The series was adapted by old Sopranos hand Terence Winter from a book by Nelson Johnson. It’s a huge story melding Nucky’s back-room dealings and private life with the quiet but determined Margaret, along with events such as the Black Sox Scandal, the rise of Capone, presidential elections and gang wars. Oddly enough, it is occasionally criticised for its slow pace, but it remains psychologically sophisticated and a mesmerising portrait of a wild age. Winner of 12 Emmys, two for Outstanding Drama Series, and the Golden Globe for Best Drama Series.

Classic episode: Two Impostors (ep 11, series 3). Nucky, Chalky and Capone line up against Sicilian psycho Gyp Rosetti, who’s threatening to dislodge Nucky from Atlantic City. An attempted hit on Nucky, car chases, shootouts. After a slow build, the series delivered full-throttle gangster mayhem. Even Nucky was blasting, and Capone was cool amid the bloodbath – ‘I’ve been on the road for 18 hours. I need a bath, some chow, and then you and me sit down, and we talk about who dies.’

Watercooler fact: The pilot episode was directed by Martin Scorsese and reputedly cost $18million to produce.

State of Play — Killer TV No 18

B0007ZD6YK.02._SS400_SCLZZZZZZZ_V1118152570_BBC1, 2003

‘One of my officers was murdered. Don’t piss me about.’ DCI William Bell

David Morrissey, John Simm, Kelly Macdonald, Polly Walker, Bill Nighy, Philip Glenister, James McAvoy, Marc Warren

Identikit: When Sonia, a political aide, is killed on the London Tube, a newspaper starts an investigation that will lead to a conspiracy of political corruption and oil industry influence in the government.


logosWhat begins as two apparently unconnected deaths – one that appears drug-related, one of the young researcher of an MP, who falls under a Tube train – spirals into evidence of a conspiracy. As reporters played by Kelly Macdonald and John Simm investigate, they discover that not only was Stephen Collins, MP, the chairman of the energy Select Committee, having an affair with Sonia, his researcher, but that she had received a call from a murdered youth, who was gunned down in the street. Kelvin Stagg had stolen a briefcase and was attempting to sell it back to its owner when he and a passing courier were shot by a hit man. The murder of a detective watching over the recuperating courier rounds off the opening episode of one of the most pacy, exciting thrillers ever to be made for UK television. It was also ahead of its time in depicting the blagging used by our reporter heroes to harvest personal information from hospitals and phone records (years before Hackgate exposed the dirty, non-investigative side of it). David Morrissey is terrific as the unfaithful politician husband in turmoil, whose lover may have had more baggage than he ever imagined. Bill Nighy counterbalances Morrissey’s emotional performance with a razor-sharp turn as the cynical newspaper editor – ‘Either he [Collins] is faking it or he’s nobbing her.’ And he has many of the best lines – ‘Don’t kiss your own arse till you get us a name.’ And a pre-Life on Mars Philip Glenister plays a seriously intimidating detective chief inspector, showing just how powerful he can be in a straight role. His scenes with Nighy’s slippery editor are riveting. Oil industry obfuscation and corruption, human drama, wit, chases and intrigue – thrillingly directed by David Yates, who made several of the Harry Potter films – all go into making this a high point in UK crime drama. Written by one of the UK’s best writers, Paul Abbott (Shameless, Hit & Miss), the six-part thriller had superb dialogue, was politically caustic, and had a superlative British cast, one of the best ever assembled, many of whom have gone on to major successes in the US – Morrissey and Simm being particularly fine.

Sequel: the 2009 movie with Russell Crowe was decent but couldn’t resist Hollywood’s obsession with convoluted twist endings.

Classic episode: Each episode of this six-parter is engrossing, but the final episode ties the drama together brilliantly, with one final, oh-bloody-hell twitst.

Watercooler fact: The BBC wanted a sequel series, but apparently Paul Abbott, after working on a script, couldn’t make the story work. Which may be just as well – sequels rarely match an inspired original.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/drama/stateofplay/

Boardwalk Empire 5, Sky Atlantic, with Steve Buscemi, Stephen Graham, Kelly Macdonald PREVIEW

Boardwalk Empire - Series 05 Steve Buscemi
Enoch ‘Nucky’ Thompson looks out for new opportunities in Cuba. Pics: Sky Atlantic

Rating: ★★★★

Sky Atlantic: starts Saturday, 13 September, 9pm

Story: The series jumps forward seven years to 1931 as the country struggles to cope with the Great Depression and the end of Prohibition looms. Nucky sets his sights on a post-Prohibition future…

THE FIFTH AND FINAL season is back with a bang.

Chalky (Michael Kenneth Williams)

Several bangs, in fact. And a stabbing, and a slicing, and… But Boardwalk Empire has always been about more than the bursts of violence, lurid though these can be. It has even been criticised for being too slow during past series.

Its speciality has been its portrayal of a slightly mad era in US history. Prohibition crept in and tipped the whole country into illegality and disregard for law and the Constitution. From the bold and lavish opening episode of series one, directed by Martin Scorsese (still an executive producer), it’s been a hotsy-totsy ride, as they might have said back then.

Nucky Thompson, the corrupt treasurer of Atlantic City – played with relish again here by Golden Globe winner Steve Buscemi – was the emblem of bent politics where it met gangsterdom. The bootlegging empires, the rise of mobsters such as Al Capone and the civic venality has all been engrossingly captured in a drama for which history was not a twee backdrop but the whole point of the show.

Nucky goes to Cuba

Boardwalk Empire - Series 05 Gretchen Mol
Gillian (Gretchen Mol)

As this series begins, the action has sped forward seven years to 1931. Prohibition is on its last legs and Nucky is in Cuba with Sally Wheet, planning to cash on the possibility of shipping Bacardi to the States the second the 18th Amendment of the Constitution is consigned to the bin.

The country is also reeling from the Great Depression, starkly illustrated in a tragic scene where Nucky’s estranged wife Margaret is shown at the Wall Street bank where she now works.

Actually, there’s so much going on in this opener, you need to be more alert that Nucky is in Cuba as he tries to dodge a particularly vicious assassin.

Five storylines unfold in tandem. In addition to Nucky and Margaret, we glimpse Nucky’s musings on his past in 1880s Atlantic City, when as a boy from an impoverished family he came into the orbit of the Commodore.

Chalky and Lucky Luciano

We catch up with Chalky, who’s fallen a long way from his power base, now shuffling along in a chain gang. Then there is also Lucky Luciano, who sets a bloody plan into operation, with

Boardwalk Empire - Series 05 Stephen Graham
Al Capone (Stephen Graham)

Vincent Piazza again a chilling presence as the gangster.

Some people say Boardwalk Empire is more akin to The Wire in its exploration of a society than The Sopranos, but it does look as though this final chapter will be more focused on Nucky than ever. The flashbacks are vivid and finally offer a glimpse into the motivations of the man at the centre of events. As he looks forward, Nucky can’t help looking back.

Boardwalk Empire has been overshadowed in the HBO stable by the likes of Game of Thrones, and has not often been the darling of the awards nights. But it has built into a fine series – season four was the best yet – and will be missed.

Oh, and when the violence comes, it gives you quite a jolt.

Cast: Steve Buscemi Nucky Thompson, Stephen Graham Al Capone, Kelly Macdonald Margaret Thompson, Gretchen Mol Gillian Darmody, Vincent Piazza ‘Lucky’ Luciano, Michael Shannon Nelson Van Alden, Paul Sparks Mickey Doyle, Shea Whigham Eli Thompson, Michael Kenneth Williams Chalky White, Jeffrey Wright Valentin Narcisse, Patricia Arquette Sally Wheet, Anatol Yusef Meyer Lansky, Ben Rosenfield Willie Thompson, Michael Zegen Benjamin ‘Bugsy’ Siegel

Also check out…
Boardwalk Empire on the HBO site
Sky Atlantic

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Boardwalk Empire series 2 PREVIEW

Dark times in Atlantic City. Pics: BSkyB

Rating ★★★★

Sky Atlantic, from Saturday, 8 October, 9pm

Story: Nucky braces himself for betrayal and faces investigation for voter fraud, a probe that could leave him facing time in jail.

As season two of this great-looking Prohibition drama starts, city treasurer and chief protector of the bootleggers Nucky Thompson senses there are enough plots being distilled around him that he’s in for a bad hangover. Or worse.

When the first series ended, Jimmy and the Commodore were uniting over their mutual resentment of Nucky. Here we see the Commodore pushing all Jimmy’s buttons. When Nucky reaches out to his former protege, it becomes clear their shared past now means little to Jimmy.

A frosty meeting between Nucky and Chalky

Further problems awaits when Chalky’s distillery is attacked by Klan members, who kill several of his men. When Chalky manages to shoot a fleeing hooded figure, racial violence threatens to erupt in Atlantic City, pitting allies Chalky and Nucky against each other.

And of course, in Chicago, Al Capone and his fellow mobsters Arnold Rothstein and Lucky Luciano are waiting to grab some of Nucky’s lucrative pot.

While Boardwalk Empire is not as adored as other HBO landmark shows such as The Sopranos and The Wire, it is hard not to be swept along with the scale of the storytelling. This opener begins with a terrific montage of music – ‘After you get what you want, you don’t want it no more’ – parties, booze-ups and a reintroduction to the principal characters.

Boardwalk‘s characters are certainly not as indelible as those in the other two crime classics, but its merits are in its rich portrayal of a mad and colourful period in America.

Creator and executive producer Terence Winter says, ‘The main theme of season two is family. What is it? What is not? And how far will we go to protect?’

Not much to laugh about – Nucky

So, Nucky – again played with an air of exasperation by Steve Buscemi – has his problems not only with Jimmy but with Margaret’s chubby son, who seems to be developing an affection for starting fires.

Series one took eight Emmys, including one for Martin Scorsese’s grand pilot episode, and two Golden Globes. Series two opens with a punch and lays down some intriguing storylines, ending with Nicky in a very tight spot.

It’ll be interesting to see whether the drama will go on to attract a wider fanbase. But, like any self-respecting mobster, when Boardwalk Empire‘s in the room it’s too big and flash to ignore.

Cast: Steve Buscemi Nucky Thompson, Kelly Macdonald Margaret Schroeder, Michael Pitt Jimmy Darmody, Stephen Graham Al Capone, Vincent Piazza Lucky Luciano, Dabney Coleman Commodore Louis Kaestner

Boardwalk Empire PREVIEW

Steve Buscemi as Nucky Thompson (pics: BSkyB)

Rating ★★★★★

Sky Atlantic, Tuesday, 1 February, 9pm

New channel Sky Atlantic has a real bruiser of a series to get its launch some attention. Boardwalk Empire is gaudy, seductive and, like all sharp gangsters, right on the money.

The opening 90-minutes is particularly flash with the cash (a rumoured $20-odd million). The Martin Scorsese-directed episode is dazzling, a kaleidoscopic swoop through the vice-ridden adult playground that was Atlantic City at the launch of Prohibition.

Epic drama about the Roaring Twenties
This is an epic series with ambitions and themes that dwarf most dramas attempted in Britain or America. It’s about the birth of the gangster myth, about power and portraying that mad, glamorous, anything-goes era in American history, the Roaring Twenties. Crowd scenes, lavish sets, period detail and superb actors and writers make this an offer you can’t refuse.

Al Capone (Stephen Graham) and Jimmy Darmody (Michael Pitt)

It’s the eve of the Volstead Act coming into effect. Crowds along the seafront of Atlantic City are celebrating – a giant bottle of hooch in a casket is mockingly given a New Orleans-style funeral send-off. The countdown to midnight commences, and the booze ban is celebrated in nightclubs with – what else? – the popping of champagne corks.

We meet Enoch ‘Nucky’ Thompson – Steve Buscemi in a Golden Globe-winning performance – the town’s treasurer, unofficial ruler, and man pledged to keep the booze flowing regardless.

Meet the boys – Al Capone and Lucky Luciano
Half unscrupulous politician, half gangster, he’s meeting some serious criminals from New York in the shape of Arnold Rothstein (play with menacing authority by Michael Stuhlbarg), Jim Colosimo (Frank Crudele), Lucky Luciano (Vincent Piazza), and a nervy novice mobster in Al Capone (British actor Stephen Graham).

Nucky has the backing of his brother and town sheriff, Elias (Shea Whigham), and many ward bosses and local thugs. Another of the entourage is his driver, Jimmy Darmody (Michael Pitt), a veteran of the Great War who, having escaped the horrors of France, is determined to cash in big style during peacetime.

Jimmy Darmody and wife Angela (Aleksa Palladino)

The opening episode offers a taste of complications to come for Nucky. Jimmy is dangerously ambitious and, with trigger-happy Al Capone, hijacks Nucky’s booze consignment for New York. The heist goes wrong, four men are killed and New York’s gangsters don’t get their valuable cargo.

Nucky’s personal life is also shifting. We first see him reducing members of a women’s temperance meeting to tears with an anecdote about the evils of booze. One of the audience, Margaret Schroeder (another Brit, Kelly Macdonald), seeks him out and asks if he could find her violent drunk of a husband some work. It’s a fateful encounter for the widower Nucky.

Scorsese’s operatic assassinations
Boardwalk Empire gets so many things right. There are Scorsese’s operatic assassination scenes, the ragtime soundtrack, and the brilliant storytelling. It does what the best US series manage brilliantly and British ones rarely do – inter-weaving complex characters into big historical events.

So Nucky is shrewd, tender, corrupt, humorous, insightful, ruthless and at times reckless. Though Buscemi bears little resemblance to the real Nucky, a grey-haired bear of a man, his performance is irresistible. His face always betrays to the audience the cynicism behind the politician’s lies, and no one enunciates the f-word more emphatically.

If looks could kill – Knucky’s not happy

At one point he questions the choice of a new name that one of his bootleggers has picked for himself. ‘A rose by any other name,’ Nucky says.

‘What does that mean?’ the bootlegger says.

‘Read a fucking book.’

Recreating the crazy age of Prohibition
Terence Winter, the Emmy-winning writer from The Sopranos (which is being re-shown on Sky Atlantic), is the series’ creator. HBO offered him the chance to conjure a drama from a book by Nelson Johnson about the seaside city’s corrupt history. To keep clear of Tony Soprano comparisons, Winter chose the Prohibition era as his subject, and it is a glamorous and wild time to watch.

From boxing contests between dwarfs, to seafront palmistry, the stunt of using the newly-invented baby incubator as a carnival attraction, and onto Eddie Cantor’s vaudeville act – it’s an unforgettable glimpse into the early Twentieth century.   

This series will have you rooting for the characters, wincing at the violence, laughing, and wanting to know more about this period in Atlantic City. TV drama hardly gets much better than this.

• Boardwalk Empire has a fantastic interactive site here.

Scorsese’s Boardwalk Empire on Sky 2011

The Making of Boardwalk Empire

The most exciting nugget in the recent announcement that Sky is to become home to all HBO‘s gold-standard programming is the arrival next year of Martin Scorsese’s Prohibition-era drama Boardwalk Empire.

It’s scripted by The Sopranos Emmy-winning writer Terence Winter and has Steve Buscemi in the lead as Nucky Thompson, Atlantic City’s real-life political boss and racketeer. Michael Pitt and William Hill also star, along with Brits Kelly Macdonald and Stephen Graham, who follows his Baby Face Nelson in Public Enemies with a turn here as Al Capone.

Other notorious faces of the time who crop up are Lucky Luciano and Arnold Rothstein.

CrimeTimePreview will be following the build-up to this big hunk of event TV and preview it at the first opportunity. In the meantime, feast your eyes…

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