NYPD Blue — Killer TV No 9

600x600bb-85ABC, 1993-2005

‘Andy, I don’t know if you should be a cop, but I think you got a lot of guts.’ – Lt Fancy

‘ Yeah well, for a while there, I was wearing them outside my clothes.’

– Andy Sipowicz, on returning to duty after being shot

Dennis Franz, David Caruso, Jimmy Smits, Rick Schroder, Mark-Paul Gosselaar, Kim Delaney, Gordon Clapp, Sharon Lawrence

Identikit: The personal and professional grind of law enforcement at the fictional 15th precinct of Manhattan.


logosMoving on from Hill Street Blues, Steven Bochco and David Milch created this much-admired, long-running new show and simultaneously hauled the genre further away from TV’s homogenised world of The FBI, Hawaii 5-O and Madigan. Location shooting, bad language and nudity – the latter of which had the American Family Association frothing – gave the drama edge and depth, and it had a greater level of perspective on the harshness and injustice of police work than was common on mainstream TV at the time. The series hit the ground with sirens blaring. From the pilot onwards, NYPD Blue was focused on the characters. Our first glimpse of the abrasive Andy Sipowicz (Dennis Franz, another Hill Street veteran) is of him ‘flipping out’ in the courtroom as he loses a case against a mob guy (he appears to have broken the rules in getting Alfonse Giardella to court, anyway). His alcoholism is destroying him and his career, and later Sipowicz drunkenly attacks the gangster. Giardella retaliates eventually by shooting Sipowicz. This storyline, however, is used to give prominence to the characters of Sipowicz and his partner, John Kelly (David Caruso). Kelly is going through an emotionally cutting divorce, and now seems to be losing his work partner too – ‘You were like a father to me, man,’ he tells the unconscious Sipowicz in hospital. Dennis Franz played Sipowicz as the epitome of a hard-bitten New York cop (though with a heart of gold), David Caruso did his finest work here, and there were many standout performances along the way from actors who went onto further excellent series – David Schwimmer, Sherry Stringfield, Daniel Benzali and more. Booze, corruption, marital mayhem and death – NYPD Blue is a powerful drama. It survived Caruso’s departure during season two, with Jimmy Smits stepping in in fine style as Bobby Simone, another character with demons (he’s grieving for death of his wife). Bochco and Milch, with the invaluable input of Bill Clark, a former NYPD officer turned producer, guided the cop show into a grittier, more adult landscape with this indelible series.

Classic episode: True Confessions (season 1, episode 4). No fireworks here, but just a finely crafted episode in which Sipowicz bristles at working for a new boss, the alcoholic, slapdash detective Walker, and Kelly assists a wealthy, battered wife who shoots her husband. The episode, rated by TV Guide in the US as one of the 100 greatest of all time, is also a shock reminder that there was a time when David Caruso used to act, as revealed in the scene where Kelly’s addressing a tenants’ association and chokes up at the memory of his father, who was the victim of a shooting.

Watercooler fact: Dennis Franz was the only cast member to stay on the beat for the entire run of NYPD Blue, appearing in all 261 episodes.

CSI: Miami series 10 starring David Caruso PREVIEW

Rating: ★★★


Channel 5: Saturdays, starts 21 July, 10.10pm


Story: Horatio strives desperately to save Natalia, before setting a trap for Randy North. In episode 2, Wolf is called to a murder scene at an expensive hotel, where the wealthy victim turns out to be a gigolo.

The tilt of the head, the clenched delivery of his questions, the eyes narrowed – David Caruso’s Horatio Caine is back for one last series of CSI: Miami.

The slick forensic investigations into the murders in the Florida paradise have been hugely popular around the world since 2002. It resurrected Caruso’s career, which was riding high in the 1990s in NYPD Blue, until he left and tried to establish himself as a leading man in movies. However, Kiss of Death and the terrible Jade sent his soaring career into tailspin – until CSI: Miami.

Caruso’s performance has shrunk
This is not as good a show as NYPD Blue, which had far more heart in its depiction of big city cops battling to do the right thing, with Caruso’s John Kelly teamed up with the excellent Dennis Franz as Andy Sipowicz.

CSI: Miami, made by CBS and a long way from the brilliant dramas being made these days by HBO and AMC, is formulaic and Caruso’s performance seems to have shrunk to a series of ticks and gimmicks.

Forensic TV genre
That’s not to say that the formula hasn’t been lapped up by viewers, with CSI and its spin-offs in Miami and New York triggering the forensic TV genre, including gorefests such as Waking the Dead, Silent Witness and Bones.

But the special effects camera along drainpipes, through bodies and bullet trajectories to explain modes of death are coming to an end – in Miami at least (CSI and CSI: New York live on).

As one past episode title put it – Bone Voyage.

Cast: David Caruso Horatio Caine, Emily Procter Calleigh Duquesne, Jonathan Togo Ryan Wolfe, Rex Linn Frank Tripp, Eva La Rue Natalia Boa Vista, Omar Miller Walter Simmons, Adam Rodriquez Eric Delko

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Third Degree: Ann Cleeves

Award-winning British novelist Ann Cleeves is a serial crime writer, with her collections including amateur sleuths George & Molly, Inspector Ramsay, the soon-to-be-televised Vera Stanhope, and the recent Shetland Island Quartet. crimetimepreview pulls her in for questioning about her TV habits…

Your favourite British crime series or thriller on TV?

This is very tricky.  I loved Morse, but having watched those again, they do seem very slow.  I thought the recent working of Sherlock Holmes was magnificent – witty, fun and capturing the essence of the original.

Favourite US crime series or thriller on TV?

I enjoyed the old series like NYPD Blue and Homicide: Life on the Street.  I’ve never watched The Wire, but everyone tells me I should.

Top TV cop?

Taggart – can’t remember the actor’s name [Mark McManus] but he was fantastic.

Which unfilmed book/character should be made into a TV drama?

Martin Edwards wrote a series set in Liverpool with sixties song lyrics as titles and a solicitor hero.  I think Liverpool would provide a brilliantly atmospheric back-drop and Harry Devlin is a great character.

If one of your novels were filmed, who would you cast to be the hero?

One has – the Vera Stanhope books have been adapted for ITV with Brenda Blethyn as the hero – they’ll be broadcast in the spring.  I wouldn’t have considered Brenda as Vera but she’s magnificent.  I hear her voice in my head now when I’m writing dialogue.

If the Shetland books were filmed I’d like David Tennant to be Jimmy Perez.  He’s known for his manic energy but I think he could do intense stillness very well too.

What do you watch with a guilty conscience (or what’s your guilty pleasure)?

US Law and Order.  Absolutely bizarre plot lines.

Least favourite cop show/thriller?

Rosemary and Thyme.

Do you prefer The Wire or The Sopranos?

I haven’t seen either.

Marple/Poirot or Sherlock Holmes?

Holmes.  I really don’t get Christie.

Wallander – BBC or the Swedish version?

Absolutely the Swedish version.  The BBC film looked beautiful, but lost the sense of Kurt’s team, which is so important in the books.

US or British television crime dramas?

British, but only because I don’t know much about US contemporary programming.

Your favourite crime/thriller writers?

I love the Nordic writers – I’m chair of judges for the CWA International Dagger so I get sent loads of wonderful books. My favourite at the moment is Johan Theorin – wonderful!

Favourite non-crime/thriller author?

My favourite book is still probably Le Grand Meaulnes by Alain Fournier  (The Lost Domaine in translation).  I read it for French A Level and it’s romantic and a perfect book for an adolescent. I still find it moving and mysterious.

Favourite crime movie or thriller?

Fargo.  I love the snow.

You’ve been framed for murder. Which fictional detective/sleuth would you want to call up?

Helen Mirren from Prime Suspect.

Ann’s Shetland Island Quartet of stories reached its climax with Blue Lightning, which is available in paperback. Hidden Depths, starring Brenda Blethyn as DI Vera Stanhope, should be broadcast by ITV1 in the Spring.

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