Bradley Walsh leaves Law and Order: UK — is this the last ever episode?

BRADLEY WALSH as DS Ronnie Brooks, GEORGIA TAYLOR as Kate Barker, DOMINIC ROWAN as SCP Jacob Thorne and BEN BAILEY SMITH as DS Joe Hawkins. Law & Order: UK
Bradley Walsh, Georgia Taylor, Dominic Rowan and Ben Bailey Smith

IT’S THE FINAL episode of series 8 tonight – but it could also be the last ever story from Law & Order: UK.

Called Repeat to Fade, it was due to go out in April but was cancelled following the tragic stabbing of teacher Ann Maguire. In the meantime Bradley Walsh has announced that he is leaving the drama after eight successful seasons to take on other projects in drama and entertainment.

‘There may well come a time when we revisit Law & Order: UK,’ says ITV’s Director of Drama Commissioning Steve November. ‘For the moment we’ll be resting the series whilst we continue to refresh our drama slate.’

Bradley Walsh has said: ‘Ronnie Brooks [his character] is one of my best friends. It’s been an absolute pleasure to inhabit Ronnie’s Mac for as long as I have. Eight series is a wonderful achievement for everyone involved in the production. This has been one of the hardest decisions I have ever had to make. I hope one day to revisit him, but for now I’d like the opportunity to pursue other drama projects which ITV are developing.’

Huge turnover of cast in Law & Order: UK

One feature of the series, a spin-off from Dick Wolf’s long-running US show, is that it has had a spectacular turnover of cast. Jamie Bamber, Paul Nicholls, Harriet Walter, Paterson Joseph, Ben Daniels, Freema Agyeman and Bill Paterson have all departed, leaving Bradley Walsh as the only original actor still in place through all the changing faces.

Losing all these fine performers has not helped the series, and you wonder if Bradley Walsh found it difficult striking a rapport with new partners and cast members for every series.

Ben Bailey Smith only joined the show as Joe Hawkins for series 8, but he has been Ronnie Brooks’s fourth partner. What was clear amid all the upheaval was that L&O: UK would struggle to keep its identity if Bradley Walsh ever joined the exodus.

The taut format of police and legal characters dealing with crimes whose outcomes were often morally and legally ambiguous has been a steady ratings winner for ITV. L&O: UK was also sold around the world.

Is the show now out of date?

But is the police procedural finally losing its lustre for drama commissioners? With series such as Broadchurch and Happy Valley proving ratings and critical hits, it could be that ITV and the BBC are looking for more character-driven stories that reach a conclusion at the end of each series. Steve November does refer to ‘refreshing our drama slate’.

Law & Order: UK. SHARON SMALL as DI Elizabeth Flynn
Sharon Small as DI Flynn

As for tonight’s episode, it’s easy to see why it was pulled in April because it is about a stabbing at Borough Market. Ronnie Brooks is at the centre of the drama, as he is needled by a 15-year-old suspected of the crime. Ronnie says eventually the lad has confessed to him that he did stab the woman. Trouble is, no one else, including Joe, hears this confession.

Sharon Small arrives on the scene as DI Elizabeth Flynn, replacing Ronnie and Joe’s former boss Wes Layton, and her character’s not impressed with Ronnie’s conduct of the case.

So, Ronnie bows out on a very difficult investigation. He’s been the best thing in the series during its five-year run, and will be missed.

Law & Order: UK is on ITV at 9pm.

See also…

Our interview with L&O: UK lead writer Emila di Girolamo
Our review from 2010

Follow @crimetimeprev

Law & Order: UK series 8, ITV, with Bradley Walsh, Ben Bailey Smith PREVIEW

BEN BAILEY SMITH as DS Joe Hawkins and BRADLEY WALSH as DS Ronnie Brooks. Law and Order: UK, ITV
DS Ronnie Brooks and new partner DS Joe Hawkins (Ben Bailey Smith). Pics: ITV

Rating: ★★★★

ITV: starts Wednesday, 12 March, 9pm

Story:
Ronnie and his new partner Joe are leading an investigation into the death of jeweller Harry Bernstein who is found dead with no hands or teeth.

THE cast of ITV’s hit reworking of Dick Wolf’s hugely successful US drama may chop and change, but Bradley Walsh’s dependable old trooper Ronnie Brooks soldiers on.

Which is great for the series. ITV has exported L&O: UK all round the world – even back to the US – and in eight series over five years, it has become a very successful part of the channel’s drama line-up, nabbing 5.4million viewers during the last series.

It won’t challenge the best shows around – currently led by True Detective on Sky Atlantic – but its taut stories exposing the vagaries of the legal process are far more gripping than Midsomer Murders or Death in Paradise.

Ronnie Brooks is now the face of the show

Bradley Walsh doesn’t do anything spectacular as an actor on the show, but he is likeable as an

 Law and Order: UK, ITV. ROSALYN WRIGHT as Miranda Jones, GEORGIA TAYLOR as Kate Barker and DOMINIC ROWAN as SCP Jacob Thorne
Barker and Thorne with their witness, Rosalyn (right)

idealised decent, by-the-book copper with his neat hair, spectacles and mac, and no one else on it has his sheer watchability. The former footballer turned comic, quizmaster and actor has now earned his acting spurs to such a degree that he was up against David Tennant and Benedict Cumberbatch at the National TV Awards (Cumberbatch won).

His character’s veteran status – he’s the only original face still on duty – is highlighted in this new series by the arrival of his latest partner, DS Joe Hawkins, played by Ben Bailey Smith (aka rapper and standup Doc Brown).

Hawkins is straight in from child protection and early on there is friction between him and Ronnie when they are interviewing a young lad who may have witnessed a horrible murder in a car park. Joe, the younger man, effectively tells Ronnie that the boy is traumatised and should be questioned more gently, and Ronnie doesn’t initially like being told how to do his job.

Dale Horgan, drug dealer and vicious murderer

The friction between them is just one story strand in yet another strong start to a L&O: UK series, typically appearing at first to be about one crime, but

 Law and Order: UK, ITV. PETER BARRETT as Dale Horgan
Nasty piece of work – Dale Horgan

then turning into an investigation into a different offence, and on this occasion one that is much more harrowing.

It opens in adrenaline-pumping style with a car chase, a crash and a grisly discovery. The driver pursued by police is dead, but in his boot is a corpse with no hands or teeth. This is the body of a gem dealer, and at first this appears to be some kind of business vendetta.

But instead, Brooks soon finds himself up against a really nasty operator, Dale Horgan, a drug dealer and vicious murderer who the detective sergeant has been trying to imprison for years.

Future guest stars

The legal team of Thorne (Dominic Rowan) and Barker (Georgia Taylor) raised the stakes in court, but the episode ends badly for Brooks. All of which sets things up nicely for ensuing weeks.

Helen Baxendale and Diana Quick are among the bewigged characters in this opener, and upcoming guest stars include Hattie Morahan, Joseph Millson, the late Roger Lloyd Pack, Colin Salmon, Roy Hudd, Christopher Fulford, Haydn Gwynne and Harriet Walter.

A fine line-up – but it’s unlikely any of their characters will outshine Ronnie Brooks.

Cast: Bradley Walsh DS Ronnie Brooks, Ben Bailey Smith DS Joe Hawkins, Paterson Joseph DI Wes Leyton, Dominic Rowan Jacob Thorne, Georgia Taylor Kate Barker, Peter Davison Henry Sharpe, Helen Baxendale Eleanor Richmond, Tracy Brabin Lyndsey Bernstein, Diana Quick Judge Hall, Christopher Fulford Mickey Belker, Michael Culkin Justice Lockwood, Dale Horgan Peter BarrettSonny Serkis Danny (Eyeris) 

Law & Order: UK lead writer Emilia di Girolamo

Emilia di Girolamo, the lead writer on series 5 of Law & Order: UK, is promising some of the most explosive and heart-rending stories yet seen on the show.

The drama, which was spun-off from the classic US series and takes the original American storylines as the basis for each London-based episode, has now become a popular drama fixture for ITV1 (on Sundays, 9pm).

Here Emilia reveals how she has shifted the tone of this latest series, giving the lead characters, DS Ronnie Brooks (Bradley Walsh) and DS Matt Devlin (Jamie Bamber), more emotional depth, and how season five is heading for a huge cliffhanger finale. Her episodes in this series are ‘Safe’ (ITV1 Sunday 17 July, 9pm), ‘Deal’ and ‘Survivor’s Guilt’.
 

Emilia, who lives in Hastings, also discusses her career in scriptwriting. Having got a PhD in the rehabilitation of offenders and worked with prisoners, she decided to become a writer and spent years struggling for a break into television. She also reveals which popular BBC1 series she would love to write for.

Now that her work on series 5 and the next series of Law & Order: UK is finished, Emilia is writing an original drama series for Clerkenwell Films/ITV, and working exclusively with prisoner Jeremy Bamber to tell the story of the White House Farm murders, for which he has so far served 25 years in prison, while maintaining he is innocent.

Ronnie and Matt (Bradley Walsh and Jamie Bamber). Pics: ITV

The new series delves into Matt and Ronnie’s lives – can you give some idea what’s in store for them?

Both Matt and Ronnie will go on extraordinary journeys this season. For Ronnie, it all starts in episode 2, ‘Safe’, when he discovers his estranged daughter is pregnant and continues into season 6. Ronnie is faced with questioning his past and present behaviour and the fallout of one tiny moment in time will leave Ronnie emotionally challenged as never before. Matt also goes on his own journey this season and finds it hard to control his anger when faced with one particular offender – Mark Ellis, a cold blooded drug dealer played brilliantly by Charles Mnene. In this role Charles is like something out of The Wire – utterly convincing and very, very frightening.

In such a tight format, is it difficult to do this – to explore the characters?
It is challenging and the character arcs need to work seamlessly with the storytelling, but when it becomes part of the storytelling itself, then it works with the format. I think audiences are crying out for character-led drama right now and bringing that element to the forefront of Law & Order: UK has given us some explosive, emotional territory to explore.
Is it your ambition as lead writer to inject more depth and emotion into the characters?
Yes, and also to make sure all the stories feel relevant to a UK audience. It’s no secret I’m a big SVU fan. I love that emotional style of storytelling and I think it works well with our format. We’ve always been a little more emotional than our US counterpart and digging a little deeper into our regulars’ lives doubles the impact.
Prosecutors Alesha Phillips and Jake Thorne
Why are you concluding the series with a double bill? Will we see a different kind of story here?
‘Deal’ and ‘Survivor’s Guilt’ explore one story over two hours of television but in fact they won’t be airing together as a double, but instead we end series 5 with ‘Deal’ and kick off series 6 with ‘Survivor’s Guilt’. The two hours of storytelling mean we can delve into the story and particularly into the emotional fallout for our characters. In these two episodes we have the most explosive, emotionally charged and heart-rending episodes Law & Order: UK has ever done. We will end series 5 on an enormous cliffhanger and we believe for our loyal audience it’ll be worth the wait to find out what happens.
As a fan of the original Law & Order, can you sum up the series’ qualities? Why is it special? Do you have favourite episodes or stories?
There is something immensely satisfying about watching a case go from dead body to offender in the dock. It’s the whole story. I think this is the real magic of the formula – it’s a satisfying viewing experience which doesn’t leave a viewer wondering if the whole police case will get thrown out when it comes to court! In Law & Order we get to see the case thrown out for ourselves and usually our heroes find a way to retrieve things so all is right with the world in the end, if a little messy.
I have too many favourite episodes to mention them all but I’m very glad to be tackling two of my all time favourites in Season 5, ‘Angel’ and ‘Slave’ (‘Safe’ and Deal). They’ve both gone on huge journeys in adaptation and I’m immensely proud of them, but still love the original US eps too.
Your move from working in prisoner rehabilitation to becoming a leading TV writer sounds fascinating. Can you give some background on how this came about? When and what did you start writing, and how did your writing progress?
I worked in prison for eight years (1992-2000) using drama-based techniques to address offending behaviour and the work became the basis for my PhD. I was also writing plays during this period and wrote a novel (Freaky, 1999, Pulp Books). Freaky was optioned by Clerkenwell Films and developed for TV. Reading the scripts made me realise how much I wanted to write for television so I left my prison job, did a six-month retraining programme and started trying my luck as a TV writer.
It took a few years to get a break and a lot of projects that never made it to the screen, but I started out on EastEnders, then got the job writing one episode of Law & Order: UK – ‘Hidden’ for series 2. I was taken on to core team, then offered the job as Lead Writer/Co-Producer and now I’m incredibly fortunate to be in a position where I turn down more work than I can take on. Things have come full circle too and I’m now writing my own TV series with Clerkenwell Films for ITV1.
Jake and CPS director Henry Sharpe (Peter Davison)
How did your move to lead writer on L&O: UK come about? What is your role as lead writer?
My episodes in seasons 2-4 were very well received and when it became clear we would need to create new regulars for series 5 & 6, Executive Producer Andrew Woodhead asked me to take on the Lead Writer & Co-Producer role and create the new characters as well as shape the storytelling across series 5 and 6. I had a real vision of where I wanted our characters to go and their arc across the 13 episodes, so I jumped at the chance.
How does your expertise in prisoner rehabilitation influence your writing?
I spent eight years around offenders, looking right into the eyes of people who had done some really terrible things and trying to get to the heart of their behaviour in order to try and change it. It would be impossible to do that job and not find it influencing my writing now. I try and be as real as the format allows me to be. I like to explore morally complex and challenging territory without resorting to clichéd crime drama shorthand. I try and bring the truth of my experience with real offenders to my work on screen.
You’ve mentioned the ‘clichés’ that TV crime writers rely on. Which clichés do you think are prevalent these days on TV? What do you think are the best crime dramas?
There are a whole host of clichés that seem to surface in crime dramas – too many to mention. I suppose there are some that particularly wind me up – murderers with ridiculously complex motivations, most of the killers I met in prison actually had very simple motivations or more often the killings were spur of the moment and totally unplanned. I think you can be true to that reality and still weave a compellingly dramatic, complex and twisty tale that will keep viewers guessing. I think Forbrydelsen (The Killing) is the best crime drama in a long time. The characters are fantastic and the storytelling twists and turns keeping the audience on the edge of their seats throughout but also feels real. I love the layers, looking at one crime story evolve over 20 episodes from those three perspectives – the cops, the politicians and the victim’s family.
L&O: UKtackles some hard-hitting stories. How would you sum up the series’ approach to crime drama? Any unexplored stories/themes you’d like to get stuck into?
We try and make drama that feels relevant to a UK audience, rooted in an element of truth but dramatically entertaining. We like our audience to feel comfortable even when the territory we explore is difficult and challenging. In ‘Safe’ this season, we tackle some very dark territory, but Ronnie takes our audience on that journey and you can’t fail to feel safe in Ronnie’s capable hands. I’ve written 10 episodes in total and really think I’ve explored everything I wanted to within this format, but I’m enjoying tackling other aspects of criminal behaviour in my new series and other original projects.
Devlin in pursuit at St Pancras
Is there any scope or desire to do completely original stories for L&O: UK?
I guess it depends how long the show runs! There are 20 years of great stories to draw on from the Mothership and we take our episodes on quite a journey in adaptation. Sometimes it’s about adapting an original a writer loves and sometimes it’s about finding an original that could work as a vehicle to explore a theme or world the writer wants to look at, so it feels liberating rather than constrictive. I certainly feel that my episodes are original and very much mine because they travel such a long way from their US counterparts. I honestly never felt the desire to write completely original stories for the show, but I’ve left now so who knows what future series will bring.
In your downtime, what do you enjoy reading and watching on TV? Favourite authors/shows?
I rarely get to read these days unless it’s a script, research material or a book I’ve been asked to consider adapting, though that does mean I get to read some great crime novels! I’m adapting The Poison Tree by Erin Kelly for STV and that’s a great read. I do watch television though and lots of it. I think Misfits is probably the best written series on UK TV in a long time – just brilliant viewing. I found The Crimson Petal & The White incredibly compelling so will definitely be watching out for Lucinda Coxon’s next project – her writing’s beautiful.
All-time favourites include The Sopranos, The Wire, Dexter, Breaking Bad, The West Wing, Conviction, Afterlife, Funland and North Square. My light relief is 30 Rock and Curb Your Enthusiasm – they both make me laugh and all crime writers need to kick back now and then!
I also love Doctor Who and Torchwood and would secretly love to write an episode of Doctor Who and give it my spin, so if you’re reading, Mr. Moffat…
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